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Published on 11/04/2020 1:44:16 PM | Source: IANS

Risk of depression increases with higher weight: Study

Posted in Beyond Market Health| #Beyond Market #Health

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Feeling depressed? Your weight might be the reason behind it as researchers have found that the risk of depression increases with higher weight.

The aim of this study, published in the journal Obesity analysis, was to describe the age and gender specific incidence of depression, the dosearesponse relationship between BMI (body mass index) and risk of depression and antidepressant drug prescribing in adults with overweight or obesity.

"Our findings highlight the complex relationship between depression and obesity," said study lead author Freya Tyrer from the University of Leicester in the UK.

"We would like to see tailored guidance on antidepressant prescribing and services that focus on both mood and behaviours to improve outcomes for these individuals," Tyrer added.

Retrospective electronic health record study using the Clinical Practice Research Datalink was conducted to identify adults with overweight and obesity (below 18 years) with an incident of depression.

In an analysis of primary care records of 519,513 UK adults who were overweight or obese between 2000-2016 and followed up until 2019, the incidence of new cases of depression was 92 per 10,000 people per year.

The risk of depression also rose with higher weight, according to the study.

The study also found that antidepressants were prescribed in approximately two-thirds of adults who were overweight or obese.

Prescriptions for fluoxetine dropped over time (from 20.4 per cent in 2000 to 8.8 per cent in 2018) and prescriptions for sertraline increased (from 4.3 per cent in 2000 to 38.9 per cent in 2018).

"We recommend guidance on antidepressant drug prescribing and specific services for people with obesity and depression that address both symptoms and behaviours," the researchers noted.